Where Should I Start My Recruiting Process?

1. The athletic recruiting process started yesterday. The best source for finding information on recruiting is the NCAA,

http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future.

The athletic recruiting process can start as earlier as the seventh grade or as late as your senior year, but you should begin thinking about athletic recruiting process in the seventh or eighth grade, and by the beginning of freshman year, you should have a complete understanding of NCAA rules and core course requirements. The recruiting process is complex and time-consuming, and waiting until the last minute is never a good idea if you’re looking for an athletic scholarship.

Important to remember that an athletic scholarship is not guaranteed!!

2. Who Should Be involved in the Recruiting Process:

It’s more than just the prospect and the college coach. College athletics directors, college admissions counselors, high school coaches, high school guidance counselors, high school teachers, club sports coaches, and family.

Where am I qualified to play?
Less than 1% of college athletes earn a Division I full ride.
There are 1,800 colleges with athletic programs
94% of them are D-2, D-3, and NAIA.

The majority of college athletes don’t compete in Division I, so set your expectations accordingly. Most college athletes are at the Division II, Division III, NAIA or junior college level.

3. What is my coach’s role?

Your coach can take care of your development on the field or on the court, but getting an athletic scholarship is your responsibility. Ultimately, your athletic ability is what earns you a scholarship, but the recruiting process requires a lot of work off of the playing field.

Know your stuff?
Legislation adopted at the 2015 NCAA Convention allows contact after a recruit’s sophomore year of high school and permits recruits to make an official campus visit beginning January 1 of their junior year.

Once the process starts, the recruiting trail tends to be year-round.
In the evaluation period, 97 percent of coaches are actively recruiting. Recruiting at non-scholastic events reaches its height in June and July when most showcases and recruiting camps are held. The peak for high school events occurs in December, January, and February. The bulk of the off-campus contact comes at non-scholastic events during the summer.

On-campus visits are an important part of the recruiting process, too. Coaches host prospects on their campuses throughout the calendar year. The number of campus visits peaks in October

College-bound student-athletes preparing to enroll in Division I or Division II school need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to ensure they have met amateurism standards and are academically prepared for college coursework.

Important NCAA Recruiting Terms:

What grade can Recruiting Start?
For purposes of By law 13.12, the phrase “prospective student-athlete” shall include any individual who has started classes for the seventh grade.

What is Contact?
Contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.
What is a contact period?
During a contact period, a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.
What is an evaluation period?
During an evaluation period a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

What is a quiet period?
During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

What is the dead period?
During a dead period, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.
What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?
Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

What is a National Letter of Intent?
A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II colleges or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules.

Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee student-athlete financial aid.
The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing a National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

What are recruiting calendars?

  • Where Should I Start My Recruiting Process?

    1.       The athletic recruiting process started yesterday. The best source for finding information on recruiting is the NCAA, http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future .

    The athletic recruiting process can start as earlier as the seventh grade or as late as your senior year, but you should begin thinking about athletic recruiting process in the seventh or eighth grade, and by the beginning of freshman year, you should have a complete understanding of  NCAA rules and core course requirements. The recruiting process is complex and time-consuming, and waiting until the last minute is never a good idea if you’re looking for an athletic scholarship.

    Important to remember that an athletic scholarship is not guaranteed!!

     

    1. Who Should Be involved in the recruiting Process: it’s more than just the prospect and the college coach. College athletics directors, college admissions counselors, high school coaches, high school guidance counselors, high school teachers, club sports coaches, and family.
    • Where am I qualified to play?
    • Less than 1% of college athletes earn a Division I full ride.
    • There are 1,800 colleges with athletic programs
    • 94% of them are D-2, D-3, and NAIA.

    The majority of college athletes don’t compete in Division I, so set your expectations accordingly. Most college athletes are at Division II, Division III, NAIA or junior college level.  

    1. What is my coach’s role?

    Your coach can take care of your development on the field or on the court, but getting an athletic scholarship is your responsibility. Ultimately, your athletic ability is what earns you a scholarship, but the recruiting process requires a lot of work off of the playing field.  

    Know your stuff?

    Legislation adopted at the 2015 NCAA Convention allows contact after a recruit’s sophomore year of high school and permits recruits to make an official campus visit beginning January 1 of their junior year.

    Once the process starts, the recruiting trail tends to be year-round.

    In the evaluation period,  97 percent of coaches are actively recruiting. Recruiting at non-scholastic events reaches its height in June and July when most showcases and recruiting camps are held. The peak for high school events occurs in December, January, and February. The bulk of the off-campus contact comes at non-scholastic events during the summer.

    On-campus visits are an important part of the recruiting process, too. Coaches host prospects on their campuses throughout the calendar year. The number of campus visits peaks in October

    College-bound student-athletes preparing to enroll in Division I or Division II school need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center to ensure they have met amateurism standards and are academically prepared for college coursework.

    Important NCAA Recruiting Terms:

    What grade can Recruiting Start?

    For purposes of Bylaw 13.12, the phrase “prospective student-athlete” shall include any individual who has started classes for the seventh grade.

    What is Contact?

    Contact occurs any time a college coach says more than hello during face-to-face contact with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

    What is a contact period?

    During a contact period, a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete and visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

    What is an evaluation period?

    During an evaluation period, a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools, and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

    What is a quiet period?

    During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus.  A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

    What is the dead period?

    During a dead period, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

    What is the difference between an official visit and an unofficial visit?

    Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by college-bound student-athletes or their parents are unofficial visits.

    What is a National Letter of Intent?

    A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete when the student-athlete agrees to attend a Division I or II college or university for one academic year. Participating institutions agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules.

    Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee student-athlete financial aid.

    The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

    Signing a National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process since participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

    A student-athlete who has signed a National Letter of Intent may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete sign a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she will lose one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at their new school before being eligible to compete.

    What are recruiting calendars?

    Recruiting calendars to help promote the well-being of prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

    Click here for D-1 and D-2 Recruiting Calendar:

    2017-18 DI Basketball Recruiting Calendar (M)

    2017-18 DI Basketball Recruiting Calendar (W)

    2017-18 DII Basketball Recruiting Calendar (M)

    2017-18 DII Basketball Recruiting Calendar (W)

    Recruiting calendars to help promote the well-being of prospective student-athletes and coaches and ensure competitive equity by defining certain time periods in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

    Click here for D-1 and D-2 Recruiting Calendar:
    2017-18 DI Basketball Recruiting Calendar (M)
    2017-18 DI Basketball Recruiting Calendar (W)

    2017-18 DII Basketball Recruiting Calendar (M)
    2017-18 DII Basketball Recruiting Calendar (W)

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